Limbering Up

It is surprising that horses and other pack animals were a significant part of transport and logistics for many armies across multiple theaters. This is particularly true of the German army. Or perhaps it isn’t surprising when you consider the challenges around building and supplying vehicles. The struggle to source, make, transport and store material like fuel and rubber was ongoing and were key considerations at the strategic level. All of which is a long way to say that I made a horse limber to tow my artillery. I don’t have a particular army list in mind, it is more for tournaments, where the cheapest tow available is sometimes exactly the right choice to free up a few points for another toy.

I haven’t painted many horses but I’m reasonably pleased with the pair. They are from a Perry ACW cavalry box bought for projects like this but otherwise not touched. The limber itself is also from the Perry ACW range.

The attending soldiers are from Artizan, a couple of those random fellows who seem to lurk at the bottom of boxes with no guidance of how they got there.

The traces are not quite right, but overall the effect is OK. And for a model that will be used for a single turn as the gun is delivered I think it will work fine.

Onwards!

Put it in the truck

Apparently the Chinese lacked transport, with most of their offensive action taking place on foot. The made for a logistical nightmare and shortages of supplies of all types at the front. One significant plus, was the Chinese were not limited to the frail and often inadequate road network. Chinese forces would bypass UN positions (often at night) in a sort of slow moving pedestrian blitzkrieg.

To reflect this in my Bolt Action Korea force I thought I would not take any transports. Bang on theme, and a couple less models to purchase and paint. However, the Bolt Action rules require tows for nearly all artillery, even light howitzers. Not unreasonable, I guess, guns are heavy and are only useful if they come with ammunition (and all the other stuff they must need). So, I ordered a Morris 15cwt 4×4 from Perry Bros. Apparently the communists had a bunch of lend lease left over from the second world war (including ex-KMT).

The kit is resin, which I don’t work with enough to really know all the tricks. Giving it a good wash seems to be the most important trick The model itself had very little flash and went together easily with a minimum of filing. The driver was british, complete with soup-bowl helmet so I did a head swap. I hid the cut with a green-stuff scarf, painted red, of course.

This is the third time I thought this army was finished. I don’t remember buying anything else recently but post being what it is at the moment, I guess we’ll find out.

See you in the trenches.

Little Mehmet

Mehmetçik- Little Mehmet was an affectionate nickname Turkish people used to refer to their soldiers during the first world war. Analogous to Digger for the Australian or New Zealand soldiers at the time. When the Soviet forces massed on the Georgian border in 1947 (at least, according to Clockwork Goblin in the world of Konflikt 47), Turkish citizens once again looked to Mehmetçik to defend their homeland.

Konflikt 47 and its close cousin Bolt Action is at heart a game of infantry combat. So representing Turkish soldiers will be key to making my home brew K-47 Turkish force a success.

My view is that elite units will have been trained and armed by German liaison units. Modelling wise, using Germans as the base will be the easiest way to reflect this, which is lucky because I have a K-47 starter box in the cupboard, so I think it is time to bust it out.

37500263_2114720725442388_4834906562701033472_nAn obvious thing to do would be to add fezzes. While this might be fun, I also think it could be quite anachronistic as fezzes became to be seen as a symbol of the Ottoman empire and in 1925 were even banned! However, the ban was for the iconic red hat, which the military never really wore. Fezzes were worn, but they tended to be khaki or black. They also came in a startling array of shapes, although this might be because of the ad hoc nature of the Republican army in the early 1920s.

Anyway, all of this gives me a lot of room for artistic license for my fictional  Turkish army, which is good because I friend gave me bag full of Handschar heads (from the Warlord SS plastic set) that I will be able to use. I think officers and maybe NCO can have the more formal fezzes.

30176567_2048344248746703_1904449405_o

I also have some metal world war one Turks about somewhere. I think these older uniforms will be able to be put to use as second line, garrison troops.

Turkey was involved in the lend lease program. I see no reason in K-47 to overlook this, as both sides courted Turkey,. No British or US tanks were purchased under the scheme (there will be more on Turkish armour in a future post), but they did receive among other items British style helmets. A mix of tommy-dishes might be another way to distinguish the regular and in-experienced troops.

My last thought is that cavalry should be included somehow, and I reckon this box of Perry American civil war cavalry might be just the thing (along with some Warlord second world war bits yet to be determined).

37401937_2114720842109043_3376805302178414592_n

 

So, just a lot of ideas today. But I wanted to share some of my thinking.

D.