mail drop

Where do you go if you need a few Turkish flags?

I don’t know about you, but I headed for an authentic Turkish hobby shop and with the aid of google translate and paypal picked up some suitable transfers.

OK, they are air force livery, but hey, I’m off fighting a weird war, so they’ll do me nicely.

Huzzah!

first two squads

The photos are terrible but I’m feeling pleased to have completed the first two squads of my Turkish Army for Konflikt 47.

Squad the first, a regular squad armed with assault rifles, ready to defend their home land. These are Warlord Games German grenadiers with fezzes from the SS set with the eagles cut off. I resisted the urge to paint the hats red. The army, where they wore them at all, wore misshapen khaki ones, so that is what I went with. This might be an alternative diesel-punk future but verisimilitude still matters.

Squad the second are Gebirgsjäger, who will give some veteran grunt and provide access to rift-tech for the force. These are metal, and I’m pretty sure they are some of the fun and characterful models from Black Tree Design.

Back to the paint desk. Those Soviets won’t stop themselves and I need to be ready.

troops update

I am still working on my Turkish army for Konflikt 47. Slowly, but paint is being applied.

These are WIP. Next up will be some highlights and pick out some detail. On the right is a basic infantryman armed with an assault rifle. He is wearing a fez, but khaki because he is on a battlefield, not on a parade ground. It is silly enough not wearing a helmet, let alone making an unnecessary target of yourself. On the left is a Gebirgsjäger who will be part of a Überwachung (Observer) squad.

Überwachung are Germans deployed to advise the Turkish troops on rift-tactics and keep an eye on the political reliability of their new allies. When upgraded to veteran status these squads gets the Rift Tech is Expensive rule, which allows a Turkish force to include units with rift technology.

Another Gebirgsjäger, this one with a bit of detail added.

As I said, some progress but a way to go.

wash your hands

In these dark days it is not totally surprising to find some plaguebearers in box. Before the current plastic ones, which are great, Games Workshop produced a few generations of metal plaguebearers.

Probably my favourite is this little guy, trying to hold his guts in with one hand while wielding a sword with the other. Such dedication.

The old and new mix well.

Quick and easy to paint, I’m pretty happy with how these turned out. And you can always use a few more daemons.

build a wall between us

No, not the southern end of the USA. I’m thinking about the lovely Crowded House song that includes a line about building a wall. This week I completed one of those projects that has been in the cupboard for a long time. Which is odd, because assembling and painting these Rubicon walls was pretty quick once I started.

A brave member of the resistance moves between the two kits: city and industrial walls

Like most of Rubicon’s work they are lovely to build and look great. Perhaps a wee bit expensive to build a whole table, but I think they will do a cracking job to add some cover and line-of-sight blocking.

I don’t know about your town, but in Melbourne it is just about a law to paint ironwork green

Nearly all of my urban terrain was collected for a grim dark future. So I am (slowly) adding some buildings more suitable for a WW2 battle. These walls look central or western european to me, but bricks and ironwork are pretty universal, so think they will be fine.

I feel the green-brown wash captures that slightly moldy way concrete seems to go

I used the biggest brush I own and slapped a layer of some sort of GW camo-green on the top. I reckon they came up OK.

I can’t find my comrades because this wall is so high

These two kits both pre-date the pandemic, so they qualify for Ann’s Neglected But Not Forgotten challenge.

See you over a table sometime soon.

D.

Aussie Home Guard

This is another of those projects where the minis have come first. These Australian Home Guard are a recent release from Eureka Miniatures, so new I’m not sure they’re even listed yet. They join a growing number of civilian/partisan style figures I have. A project will present itself no doubt. In the mean time check some of the lovely, characterful sculpts by the very talented Kosta Heristanidis.

Squad of armed civilians with red arm bands
Civilian in shirt sleeves with a red arm band, holding a bolt action rifle
I used different coloured arm-bands to keep the squads distinct
Probably my favourite unit: beer bottle molotovs! Good on ya!
A Vickers MMG as their support option.

Having put all the models together for the first time, I think I’ve made too many of the suits blue. Maybe there was a Peter Jackson sale on. Anyway, I think they have come up OK. They certainly look ready to give any assigned task a red hot go, and you can’t ask more than that from any Home Guard force.

Cheers.

Limbering Up

It is surprising that horses and other pack animals were a significant part of transport and logistics for many armies across multiple theaters. This is particularly true of the German army. Or perhaps it isn’t surprising when you consider the challenges around building and supplying vehicles. The struggle to source, make, transport and store material like fuel and rubber was ongoing and were key considerations at the strategic level. All of which is a long way to say that I made a horse limber to tow my artillery. I don’t have a particular army list in mind, it is more for tournaments, where the cheapest tow available is sometimes exactly the right choice to free up a few points for another toy.

I haven’t painted many horses but I’m reasonably pleased with the pair. They are from a Perry ACW cavalry box bought for projects like this but otherwise not touched. The limber itself is also from the Perry ACW range.

The attending soldiers are from Artizan, a couple of those random fellows who seem to lurk at the bottom of boxes with no guidance of how they got there.

The traces are not quite right, but overall the effect is OK. And for a model that will be used for a single turn as the gun is delivered I think it will work fine.

Onwards!

Hezters gonna Hetz

I spoke too soon that my Budapest Defenders were ready to go. And also that I hadn’t bought anything for the army, that all the models I used had come from my lead and plastic backlog. Well, there were just too many sales on recently, and I ordered a set of three Hetzers from Warlord Games.

The Budapest campaign book has an armoured list with a core of three assault guns, which comes with some fun special rules, or one will fit nicely into to my existing pocket defenders list. The Wirblewind will remain an option, so it is good to have choices.

Hetzers are great support choice in BA. The weak sides rule does make them more vulnerable but also cheaper, and it pretty easy to negate with some decent deployment.

The Hungarian late war paint scheme is pretty easy. Dunkelgelb and some weathering and they’re ready for the front. The Warlord models are OK, although the wheel sections do feel unnecessarily fiddly. The kit is very flexible, coming with the options to make anti-tank, flame or flak versions all in the same kit, and decals for either German or Hungarian forces. Nice.

That means my little Hungarian project is out to around 1,800 points, which is actually quite a large force. It may not be complete yet …

Budapest Defense

Together at last. Basing done and ready to hit the table. A couple of months ago I started on a new project, a Budapest Pocket Defender list for Bolt Action. One of the nice things about this army is that I did not buy anything new for it. All of the models have come from the cupboard. It is an eclectic little group, with models from Black Tree Design, Artizan and Warlord Games, and contains both Hungarian and German units making for something that looks a little different on a WW2 table.

Pioneers (Black Tree Design) in their Hanomag (Warlord Games)
Grenadiers, mix of Black Tree Design and Artizan
Warlord Games MMG
Medium Mortar (Artizan)
The whole force is led by these German officers (Black Tree Design)
Hungarian sniper team made from Warlord plastic Germans
Hungarians with an anti-tank rifle; useful against soft-skins (Warlord Games)
Hungarians from Warlord Games

This force may grow yet, but with the addition of a tank, maybe a Wirblewind (painted but never really had a part in my mid-war Italian theatre themed army), I think we are good to go. And that is a nice feeling.

D.