mail drop

Where do you go if you need a few Turkish flags?

I don’t know about you, but I headed for an authentic Turkish hobby shop and with the aid of google translate and paypal picked up some suitable transfers.

OK, they are air force livery, but hey, I’m off fighting a weird war, so they’ll do me nicely.

Huzzah!

all the tanks!

Turkey has an almost bewildering array of armoured vehicles, although it possesses relatively few of any given model. The most modern tanks are a preciously guarded resource by the higher command. Unlike the other belligerent nations, whose older stocks after 8 years or more of war are all but destroyed or relegated to training units, older Turkish vehicles are available to be put into service. The existential threat posed to Turkey in the K-47 world sees every available asset put into use. Turkish leaders hope that deploying the out-dated tanks will buy time for sufficient stocks of modern material and vehicles to be built, and help turn the tide on the Soviet invasion in the east and respond to the threat from the US/UK to the south and west.

Valentines in British service (15mm Battlefront)

During the interwar years, like many nations, Turkey acquired French tanks, 100 Renault but there is some confusion as to whether these were FTs or R35. These were added to the existing fleet of T-26 and BA-6 from Russia and handful of British Daimler Dingos and Vickers Light Tanks.

M4 Sherman (15mm PSC and 1/56 Warlord Games)

Between 1940 and 1943, the Turkish government made use of US lend lease arrangements to purchase M4 Sherman, M3 Stuarts, Valentines, and additional light tanks. Universal Carriers were also acquired at this time, adding valuable battlefield mobility to a military largely stuck with a mix of pre-war Soviet ZiS and US Ford trucks, civilian cars, and pack animals.

The core of the Turkish tank regiments is German made Panzer IV, mostly now up-gunned to the 75mm heavy anti-tank gun.

Tiger I (15mm Battlefront)

So far, all of the tanks mentioned were actually in Turkish service up to 1945. There are probably others. In additon, in the game, pretty much anything goes. At a minimum, Panzer III, Stug III/IV and Tigers all make sense. That is before the weird stuff rolls out. For Konflikt 47 this provides a fun smorgasbord of choices that helps make Turkey distinct from the other belligerent nations. Heaps of modelling opportunities too.

D.

movement reported

OSS Report 1947-9996C/4 to Allied Joint Command Mediterranean. Classified assets on the ground in Eastern Anatolia have captured images of what appear to be German rift-tech enabled units. This is a concerning development since it is understood that the German expeditionary force is operating further North, much nearer the Black Sea coastal plain. This leads our analysts to conclude that Germany has made rift technology available to the Turkish Republic.

This appears to be a Spinne Light Panzermech, light walker. Relatively fast and with moderate to long operating range it is often used in a reconnaissance role. It is usually armed with a turret-mounted light anti-tank gun and co-axial light autocannon.

Also seen was a Schwerefeld Projektor mounted on a Panzer IV chassis, designated as a Panzer IV-X by German forces, they are a potent rift-tech weapon designed especially to counter heavy armour.

A wee WIP update, with the there-is-a-lot-left-to-do models disguised with a black and white filter. In addition to painting, I have finally got around to reviewing the crazy mix of armour that Turkey had in 1945 and thinking about how to bring it into K-47. This mostly consists of finding the right entries in the Bolt Action armies of books.

D.

more assembly

The first of the vehicles for my Turkish K-47 army, a Panzer IV-X. Another WIP update. I am enjoying this project having picked it up again after a couple of years pause. I find posts like this help me to keep the momentum going.

The rift-tech versions of the Bolt Action kits are fun, as most of them have metal and/or resin parts as additions to the base Warlord models. It is like a two for one offer, especially for the Panzer IV where I can just swap the turret. In keeping with the late war theme I have chosen the Ausf. H with the long barrel and schürzen.

I removed one of the panels to represent some battle damage and used a Soviet crew member as the commander. This will help give my Turkish panzer a different feel. I almost like the Ausf. H version more than the rift-tech gun. Either will work in K-47.

Now back to painting.

troops update

I am still working on my Turkish army for Konflikt 47. Slowly, but paint is being applied.

These are WIP. Next up will be some highlights and pick out some detail. On the right is a basic infantryman armed with an assault rifle. He is wearing a fez, but khaki because he is on a battlefield, not on a parade ground. It is silly enough not wearing a helmet, let alone making an unnecessary target of yourself. On the left is a Gebirgsjäger who will be part of a Überwachung (Observer) squad.

Überwachung are Germans deployed to advise the Turkish troops on rift-tactics and keep an eye on the political reliability of their new allies. When upgraded to veteran status these squads gets the Rift Tech is Expensive rule, which allows a Turkish force to include units with rift technology.

Another Gebirgsjäger, this one with a bit of detail added.

As I said, some progress but a way to go.

Getting a little weird

I have continued to work on my Turkish army for Konflikt 47, kit-bashing and assembling the core infantry choices. In addition to adding some undercoat I also started the first of the rift tech units, some heavy infantry.

The models are the Italian Bersaglieri bought on sale at a FLGS without understanding they are quite different to their German counterparts. No worries, Avanti! as the Italians might say. A couple of odd looking headswaps later and I will run them with the German stats. Or, given it is a homebrew list, run them with the Italian stats. I will ponder that.

I have been thinking about how to include rift technology into the Turkish list. There are a couple of templates provided in the rule books. The Finish gain access to some of the horror causing units, e.g. Shrekwulfen, as well as rift tech vehicles and weapons. Finland is a motivated partner in the war against the Soviet Union, with a successful track record when given the right tools and material. Granting access to the new technology makes sense to me.

The Italians need supervision, and have access to fewer choices. I think this matches the Turkish situation better. My current thinking is to dial this up and allow rift tech in one of two ways. A Turkish force can include Axis Support, similar to Hungary and some of the other nations in Bolt Action. This can be any German unit, including horror units like Totenkorps.

Otherwise, a Turkish force can select a unit with rift tech provided the force includes a suitable German liaison unit that has the Rift Tech is Expensive special rule. This is a kind of tax on the Turks but as background means they have observers who can keep on eye on the political soundness and advise on the best use of the new weapons.

There are two German units in the Turkish list that have Rift Tech is Expensive rule, a liaison officer or an Überwachung Squad (observer squad).

Both units come with a little tweak. A liaison officer can come with translator, who then allows the German officer to use their snap to rule, increasing their effectiveness.

If the observer squad is selected as veterans they gain the Rift Tech is Expensive rule, and also provide access to vets in what is otherwise limited in vet choices for the Turks.

Available rift tech is a selection of vehicles including the Panzer X, Spinne Light and Thor Panzermechs, or armoured infantry.

A wordy post today, but I’m not far from painting so I hope to have something to show in the not too distant future.

A project revived

Far too long ago I had an idea to create a Turkish themed list for Warlord Games’ fun weird war member of the Bolt Action family, Konflikt 47. The models have been purchased and languishing in the backlog ever since. Well, I uncovered them the other day and thought I either needed to get started or move them on. Only WIP today, a public statement of intent to get some painting done! It wasn’t overly successful last time, but at least assembly has begun.

If you want painted minis I suggest having a look at the rather fun round-up of the Neglected But Not Forgotten challenge over at Anne’s Immaterium. Well worth a look for all the ace talent on show.

No weird stuff yet. I have concentrated on the Turkish army units and their supporting German troops.

WWI Ottoman Turks with a few tweaks like panzerfausts; these will be inexperienced/second line troops
Gebirgsjäger, who will take the role of Axis troops embedded with the Turkish force
One of the Turkish squads, basically grenadiers with fezzes. I have shaved off the tassel and eagle to match the military dress from the 1920s Turkish Army
Squad number two, with an LMG
Sniper team (the turban is not right, being Sikh, I’m sure he has a story tell)
An anti-tank rifle, which in K-47 can be used in the sniper role to hunt light armour and walkers
Kit-based irregular cavalry.

I have also created a draft home brew list for Turkey. It is based on the German list, but with additions motivated by the lists for Hungary and Bulgaria. More on that later. It isn’t quite ready to be released into the wild yet.

The officers including a German liaison officer

A start. More assembly yet, as I need to put together a couple of vehicles. And then the paint, of course.

Limbering Up

It is surprising that horses and other pack animals were a significant part of transport and logistics for many armies across multiple theaters. This is particularly true of the German army. Or perhaps it isn’t surprising when you consider the challenges around building and supplying vehicles. The struggle to source, make, transport and store material like fuel and rubber was ongoing and were key considerations at the strategic level. All of which is a long way to say that I made a horse limber to tow my artillery. I don’t have a particular army list in mind, it is more for tournaments, where the cheapest tow available is sometimes exactly the right choice to free up a few points for another toy.

I haven’t painted many horses but I’m reasonably pleased with the pair. They are from a Perry ACW cavalry box bought for projects like this but otherwise not touched. The limber itself is also from the Perry ACW range.

The attending soldiers are from Artizan, a couple of those random fellows who seem to lurk at the bottom of boxes with no guidance of how they got there.

The traces are not quite right, but overall the effect is OK. And for a model that will be used for a single turn as the gun is delivered I think it will work fine.

Onwards!

Budapest Defense

Together at last. Basing done and ready to hit the table. A couple of months ago I started on a new project, a Budapest Pocket Defender list for Bolt Action. One of the nice things about this army is that I did not buy anything new for it. All of the models have come from the cupboard. It is an eclectic little group, with models from Black Tree Design, Artizan and Warlord Games, and contains both Hungarian and German units making for something that looks a little different on a WW2 table.

Pioneers (Black Tree Design) in their Hanomag (Warlord Games)
Grenadiers, mix of Black Tree Design and Artizan
Warlord Games MMG
Medium Mortar (Artizan)
The whole force is led by these German officers (Black Tree Design)
Hungarian sniper team made from Warlord plastic Germans
Hungarians with an anti-tank rifle; useful against soft-skins (Warlord Games)
Hungarians from Warlord Games

This force may grow yet, but with the addition of a tank, maybe a Wirblewind (painted but never really had a part in my mid-war Italian theatre themed army), I think we are good to go. And that is a nice feeling.

D.